Serenity Matagorda Isle

Karen’s Sunday Tribune Article

Computer Trash Bin

YOU are in possession of the most elaborate computer on earth—your mind!  Despite all the technological advancements to date, nothing surpasses your one-of-a-kind mind.  But like a computer, our minds must reboot occasionally and review information that is taking up space on our mind drive that no longer serves a purpose.   With your home computer, once you’ve confirmed that such information is obsolete, there’s a safety mechanism that asks if you are sure you want to delete what is in your computer trash bin. Confirming with one simple click, the bin is emptied, and more space is opened up for your future needs.  Unfortunately, when we were born, a user’s manual was not included in our packaging.  Can you imagine how much stress and frustration might have been alleviated if one had been included, especially with a chapter on troubleshooting during our terrible twos, puberty, adolescence and adulthood?

The fact of the matter is, we only have one mind.  We often hear about our subconscious mind and its ability to run unencumbered twenty-four hours a day (the source of where our dreams come from too).  It is simply part of our one mind.  Your subconscious mind has collected data experiences and catalogued it for you should a similar event arise in your future. Author Ernest Holmes in his book “This Thing Called You” relates how your thoughts can be the generating factor of your joy or your suffering.  He says, “In reality, your subconscious mind, for what the analyst analyses and the psychologist psychologizes is not another mind, it is merely the accumulated thought and feelings of the ages operating through you.  The thing that stands between you and the greater good is a thing called thought and nothing else.  It is not Reality that you must change, but your mental reaction to it.”  

I like to use the simple example of a balloon.  Perhaps when you were a toddler you found great pleasure in going to the park and being given a bright, colorful balloon.  It brought you joy and laughter until it accidently popped.  The loud popping sound and the disappearance of the balloon created fear and anxiety in you resulting in tears and the desire to be held.  Your subconscious mind was quick to note the experience and file it away should you ever come into contact with another balloon.  Hopefully, as you get older, you make the decision to change your reaction to a popped balloon as trivial because your original reaction no longer serves a valid purpose; thus, your original observation is obsolete, so you discard it into your subconscious trash bin.  

Other examples may not be so obvious.  Some of our serious decisions as adults may be based on experiences that happened to us as kids that we never bothered to review and discard into our bin.  Holmes notes, “What is called the subjective state of your thought, the accumulated patterns, is automatically attracting or repelling.  These patterns are automatically resowing their own seeds in the creative medium of mind.  They will keep on doing this until you change them.  Your hope lies in the fact that you can change these patterns.  It is a process of the gradual re-education of your whole mental reaction.”  We can never assume that old thought patterns and beliefs that are no longer appropriate will automatically be discarded.  We must be pro-active.  It’s not about retracing through all of your collected data.  The key is to become an observer when old thought patterns and beliefs pop up, and they will.  Rather than react to them, just observe the data and ask yourself if this information is still relevant to you at this time in your life.  You may experience the negative feeling momentarily, but rather than push it back down into your subconscious, learn to review and release it to your trash bin. Gradually, you will fill your subconscious with joyful and beneficial input that will attract more of the same.  The rest will be automatically sent to your trash bin by one simple click!  

Originally published in the Bay City Tribune on Sunday, September 15, 2019

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *